Butterfly Count Co-sponsored by Land Trust

 

By Laurie Heiss and Jane Ross, June 2017.

 

On Saturday July 1st at 9:30 am, you have a perfect chance to learn about one of Redding’s natural historical treasures – its varied and beautiful butterflies. The Redding Land Trust is co-sponsoring an outdoor discussion and meadow walk with butterfly expert Victor DeMasi and his loyal team of experienced butterfly “spotters” in the area of the Crossfield Meadow at the bottom of Cross Highway. To keep meadows like Crossfield open for butterflies, dragonflies and bird populations, the RLT pays for annual mowing of all the meadows it owns so that the public may enjoy these unique plant and animal habitats.

 

Every July, for well over 20 years, Vic and his team join other butterfly spotters all over the country for the National Butterfly Count. Now you can walk, watch and learn as butterflies are identified and counted, and you, as a spotter-in-training, can refer to an identification guide provided by the RLT. Victor as a master caller/observer also provides an identity for the “hard ones.”

 

Before the two forays into the meadows on both sides of Cross Highway and while you are enjoying coffee, juice and breakfast goodies, Vic and his team will talk about the diverse butterfly population in Redding and put it in the context of national populations, butterfly migration issues and habitat loss. In Redding we are fortunate to have healthy butterfly habitats and dedicated butterfly observers.

 

One meadow has paths so that visitors can observe the butterflies and spotters without walking through the 4-5 foot tall meadows. The other meadow, Crossfield, has no paths so long sleeves, long pants and closed shoes are a must. Please park and meet at 105 and 107 Cross Highway. At 11:15 the team is off to record butterflies at four other Redding sites.

 

 

For more information, please email Redding Land Trust at info@reddingctlandtrust.org

 

 

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